Home Home Contact Us Contact Us Donate Donate



 

Yom Tovim

Select topic of interest below.

Pesach

THE ULTIMATE VICTORY - Rabbi Ephraim Nisenbaum

The celebration of Pesach is perhaps best symbolized by matzah. The eating of matzah reminds us that the Jews left Egypt in such haste, they did not have time to let their bread dough rise. Yet the Haggadah tells us that matzah is the bread of affliction, bread that our forefathers ate in Egypt. The implication is... Read More



BEYOND PESACH - Rabbi Chaim Zwick

Hopefully you have not gone through Pesach - but rather grown through Pesach. It is important to keep in mind that we have to take the levels we gained on Pesach with us as we progress through Sefira and onto Shavous. By the way, what are those levels we gained on Pesach? I commonly ask people, what is the... Read More



FASTER THAN TIME - Rabbi Akiva Tatz, M.D.

Let us look more deeply into the energy of beginnings. Both Rosh Hashanah and Passover are beginnings of the year. Rosh Hashanah is the occasion of new creation of the human as an individual; Passover is the occasion of new creation of the Jewish people. What can we learn from this observation? Read More



Shavuos


MOUNT SINAI: SEARCHING FOR THE MESSAGE - Rabbi Yehoshua Binyamin Falk

This world is filled with treasure hunters - people looking for riches in all of its forms - wealth, power, position and glory. They search high and low for clues and directional signposts to show them the way. A recent article reported on the activities of one of the most successful hedge fund managers in the world... Read More



Tisha B'Av


JOY AND PAIN: THE DANCE OF LIFE - Rabbi Ephraim Nisenbaum

This past Tisha B'Av, I watched my thirteen-year-old son publicly recite Eicha for the first time. As he read Jeremiah's heart-wrenching words, his voice started to quiver and tears began to pour down his cheeks. I thought to myself, "What am I doing to my son? Why put him through this pain and cause... Read More



Rosh Hashana


A TIME FOR PERSONAL REFLECTION - Rabbi David Aaron

Rosh Hashanah, the Day of Judgment, is actually the day that humanity was created. It is the birthday of the first human beings, Adam and Eve. Why do we celebrate our collective birthday at a time when we are being judged in the court of Hashem? Not quite the fun birthday party that we might have hoped for. Read More



LET YOUR SOUL KNOW WISDOM

Read More (PDF)



Yom Kippur


A UNIQUE PERSPECTIVE - Rabbi David Aaron

Yom Kippur is the Day of Atonement which is defined by love and forgiveness. On Yom Kippur we get a glimpse of ourselves, our choices, and our relationship to Hashem from another perspective-Hashem's perspective-and come to recognize how inseparably close we are to Hashem. This is the transformative... Read More



Succos


INNER PEACE - Rabbi David Aaron

In addition to living in the sukkah and waving the four species, it is customary on Sukkot to read the book of Koheles (Ecclesiastes), written by King Solomon. The Talmudic sages tell us that King Solomon was inspired to write this book when he realized that the Temple... Read More



Chanukah


THE NEW DIMENSION OF CHANUKAH - Rabbi Shimon Apisdorf

Let's begin by making one thing clear. If no one gives or receives even one present on Chanukah , they have not omitted or missed out on anything central to the holiday. The holiday of Chanukah has little if anything to do with the giving and receiving of gifts. Chanukah is not the Jewish season of giving. If any... Read More



Tu B'Shvat


TEACHINGS OF THE TREES - Rabbi Ephraim Nisenbaum

The fifteenth day of Shevat, Tu B'Shevat, is called the New Year for Trees. Strictly speaking, this title draws a legal distinction related to the laws of tithing in the Land of Israel. Tithes must be separated from any produce grown in Israel before it may be eaten. In a given year, the fruit taken as tithe from... Read More



Purim


PURIM: SEEING BEYOND SELF - Rabbi Ephraim Nisenbaum

Besides the mitzvot of reading the Megillah and rejoicing on Purim, we have two other mitzvot to perform: mishlo'ach manot, the sending of at least two pieces of food to a friend, and matanot l'evyonim, gifts of charity to at least two poor people. While tzedakah and acts of good will are encouraged... Read More






As a non-profit organization, the Jewish Heritage Foundation relies on the support of readers like you.
Click here to make a donation.

Copyright 2008 © Jewish Heritage Foundation. All rights reserved.  Terms of use  |  Privacy Policy

Website design by